Clients in the News – NYU Bacterial Find Points Toward a Vaccine for MRSA

Bacteria Staphylococcus aureus on the surface of skin. Concept art: Shutterstock.

New research led by NYU Langone Medical Center has uncovered why a particular strain of Staphylococcus aureus — known as HA-MRSA — becomes more deadly than other variations. These new findings open up possible new pathways to vaccine development against this bacterium, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says accounts for over 10,000 deaths annually, mostly among hospital patients.

In a series of experiments in mice and human immune cells in the lab, recently published in the journal Nature Communications online Sept. 2, the NYU Langone team found that the presence or absence of dueling toxins, or bacterial poisons, appears to explain the major difference between HA-MRSA, and its less virulent and more common, community based-based cousin, CA-MRSA, the two main types of MRSA infection.

Specifically, the researchers say, a key toxin, called LUK-PV, secreted only by community-acquired MRSA, counteracts the effects of another more deadly toxin, LUK-ED, secreted by both forms of the bacterium.

Researchers say both LUK-PV and LUK-ED are leukotoxins that target and poison immune system white blood cells meant to fight the bacterial infection, but LUK-PV is only secreted by community-acquired MRSA, or methicillin-resistant S. aureus.

According to study senior investigator and NYU Langone microbiologist Victor Torres, PhD, the newly discovered competing or “antagonistic” relationship between the two bacterial toxins helps explain how community-acquired MRSA is far more widespread and less deadly than hospital-acquired MRSA.

“Essentially, in community-acquired MRSA, the toxins neutralize each other, while in the hospital superbug form, they do not,” says Torres. Torres also says that these study results challenge the current mindset for finding a vaccine against Staphylococcal infections, including MRSA.

“No longer can we take an isolated approach of trying to target and block one leukotoxin at a time,” says Torres, an associate professor at NYU Langone. “We have to take a broader view of the pathogen and will likely have to target more than one toxin in order to develop an effective vaccine,”

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