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Clients in the News – Stanford University study finds DNA of peanut-allergic kids changes with immune therapy

Research led by immunologist Kari Nadeau shows a blood test could determine whether patients who have been desensitized to their peanut allergies need to continue eating peanuts daily to retain their immunity.
Credit: Steve Fisch

Treating a peanut allergy with oral immunotherapy changes the DNA of the patient’s immune cells, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. The DNA change could serve as the basis for a simple blood test to monitor the long-term effectiveness of the allergy therapy.

Peanut allergy, like other food allergies, currently has no cure. Scientists are conducting clinical trials of doctor-supervised immunotherapy, in which peanut-allergic patients take increasing amounts of peanut powder to try to desensitize them to the peanut allergen. At the end of the trial, patients are usually asked to eat some peanuts every day for the rest of their lives.

“At first, eating two peanut butter cups a day might seem fun, but it gets a little boring and a lot of people might stop,” said Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics at Stanford and an immunologist at Stanford Hospital & Clinics and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. Until now, doctors could not test whether patients who had completed immunotherapy could safely stop eating daily doses of peanuts, she said. “Our new finding can help us try to determine whether, for the long term, someone’s allergy has truly been shut off so people can eat ad lib.”

Nadeau is the senior author of a paper describing the new findings, which will be published online Jan. 31 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

In the new study, Nadeau’s team examined 20 peanut-allergic children and adults who had completed two years of immunotherapy, which enabled them to eat one 4-gram serving of peanuts daily without experiencing a major allergic reaction.

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