Clients in the News – Vanderbilt University Engineers develop tiny mechanical wrist gives dexterity to needlescopic surgery


With the flick of a tiny mechanical wrist, a team of engineers and doctors at Vanderbilt Univ.’s Medical Engineering and Discovery Laboratory hope to give needlescopic surgery a whole new degree of dexterity.

Needlescopic surgery, which uses surgical instruments shrunk to the diameter of a sewing needle, is the ultimate form of minimally invasive surgery. The needle-sized incisions it requires are so small that they can be sealed with surgical tape and usually heal without leaving a scar.

Although it’s been around since the 1990s, the technique, which is also called mini- or micro-laparoscopy, is so difficult that only a handful of surgeons around the world use it regularly. In addition, it has largely been limited to scraping away diseased tissue with sharp-edged rings called curettes or burning it away with tiny lasers or heated wires.

So a research team headed by Assoc. Prof. of Mechanical Engineering Robert Webster has developed a surgical robot with steerable needles equipped with wrists that are less than 1/16th of an inch (2 mm) thick. The achievement is described in a paper at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation in Seattle.

Surgeon Duke Herrell demonstrating how to manipulate endoscopic instruments in a training device. (John Russell / Vanderbilt)

The new device is designed to provide needlescopic tools with a degree of dexterity that they have previously lacked. Not only will this allow surgeon-operators to perform a number of procedures such as precise resections and suturing that haven’t been possible before, but it will also allow the use of needles in places that have been beyond their reach, such as the nose, throat, ears and brain.

“The smaller you can make surgical instruments the better…as long as you can maintain an adequate degree of dexterity,” said Prof. of Urological Surgery S. Duke Herrell, who is consulting on the project. “In my experience, the smaller the instruments, the less post-operative pain patients experience and the faster they recover.”

read more…

Comments are closed.